Friday, October 16, 2009

Nanny Training Article Correction Appended

There has been a correction to the Big City column on Tuesday, about the Absolute Best Care Learning Center. Please click here to view the correction.

Absolute Best Care Learning Center is a child care placement agency in Manhattan that offers a state-licensed course for nannies. A state license requires licensed teachers, a curriculum reviewed by an expert in the field, catalog and enrollment agreements that comply with state education laws and regulations. New York State Education Department Logo is mandated to appear on all paperwork and advertising by New York State for any State school.

Absolute Best Care is geared toward standardizing the profession of a nanny with the only NY State approved curriculum and school that will give nannies the education and tools to succeed and flourish in their jobs. Graduating students will receive a Certification, certifying them as nannies for New York.

To learn more about the program simply click on their link here. Please visit the appended The New York Times blog article by clicking here.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

That is great that a nanny can add this certificate to their portfolio but I still cannot find where it says these credits would be transferrable to a school of higher education to work towards an AA or BA degree. I am not against the training for nannies of any type. But my BS degree and those transcripts are what the parents were looking for. I think the misconception was that the ads orignially claimed they were the only nanny training program when in fact others exixt. I suppose they do not exist in New York though. Anyway one week of intensive training is a good thing if the nanny can take the time off and afford the courses. I don't know if nanny should bother if they have already earned a bachelor degree. Would be good for high school graduates hoping to be a nanny though.

Anonymous said...

No difference in any of my opinions. I agree with commenter above that if a teen can afford the course before having nanny experience it might be helpful but it will never replace a college earned degree.

Anonymous said...

What I'm not understanding is cost.
That's fine to offer a 7 day fluff nanny course (really- what can you REALLY learn about nannying, as a whole, to obtain a certification, in just 7 days?!)

For an actual nanny school like NorthWest Nanny Institute or English Nanny & Governess School... it's just a bit more money and you become immersed for many months in a real program to become a certified nanny. This whole program that this agency has going is a joke. No way would I, as a parent, send my nanny to this or suggest that any nanny shell out the bucks to do this. I'd choose a meatier program that was more substantial... Especially for the amount of cash. We're lucky that our nanny DID choose a great nanny school. It was an incredible experience for her.

Anonymous said...

I am confused that most of the nannies I know who read this newsletter attend INA conferences and recent NANC conference and pay money for workshops and do not complain about the workshops. $1,000 for classes let them do so in peace.

tobagonanny said...

I don't see a difference. What is the correction? Facebook friends have been discussing this. Training isn't the problem or argument (though a few bash the Starkey method as being servants not childcare professionals). Training is a good thing.

To pay that $ they want to earn college credts. Three college credits typically average $300 per credit. So if the cost is $900 we ought to earn three college credits that I can put towards my college degree.

This newsletter has a free sample online on nanny training and I counted about 26 or so nanny training programs in this country alone and they state there are more at community colleges all over the nation.

I quote that nanny training issue on this nanny newsletter web site on the topic.

We are supposed to ask (so would want to ask this training program):

1. year was the school founded?

2. What courses does the nanny program curriculum include?

College courses in childcare should include:
Child Development (Cognitive, Social and Emotional, Physical,
Language);
Activities (Music, Art, Science, Literature, Play);
Life Skills; Household Management; Etiquette;
Safety (Includes First
Aid and CPR);
Health Nutrition;
Family Dynamics;
Interpersonal
Relations;
Career Planning, including Resumes, Interviewing
Techniques, and Contracts;
Infant and Childcare How to Talk So
Kids Will Listen;
Guiding Children's Behavior; Practicum of hands-on training.

3. Is the program state licensed?

4. Is the program accredited?

5. Hours required to complete training?

6. Costs including tuition, applications fees, books and materials?

7. Hours required to complete training?

8. Qualification earned?

9. Admission requirements?

10. Financial aid?

11. How many students have completed the program?

12. What is the average enrollment and class size?

13. Is there a tuition refund policy?

14. Are credits transferable to another school or program?

Anonymous said...

What's the problem? There are no problems? Why do nannies sabatoge nanny programs? I've seen it before in the past for other training courses too (even one that was free!!) I am happy to hear that someone else is trying to educate nannies. We can learn a lot even in one day! How long does it take to be CPR/First Aid certified? Less than a day and the training can save a life!
Nanny, Glen Ridge NJ

Anonymous said...

The reason nannies are critical is because they are being cautious.

Years ago I took a FREE online course. But there was a registraion fee and it was non-refundable which needed to be clear that the registration fee is non-refundable. I graduated with a college degree in early childhood education so the classes ended up being much too easy and they were time consuming but I was not learning much so I wanted to drop the classes and get a prorated refund. No one mentioned it was a non-refundable registration fee. Then they didn't return my emails or calls. So the Better Business Bureau would not accept them as a member if there isn't some sort of refund available.

I am sure at this point the woman who started the program now makes it clear it's non-refundable.

Next, the Absolute Best Care training says they will refund money if someone wants to quit. That's key to becoming a member of the Better Business Bureau.

To become a member of Better Business Bureau there must be a refund policy. People can get their money back if they quit. (Of course prorated in case of a seven day program).

Most colleges offer full refund first day, then prorate the refund for the first two weeks. After that, there is no refund.

So, my gripe with the "FIRST ONLINE NANNY TRAINING PROGRAM" created years ago and still running is that the owner did not make that clear that there was no refund of the registration fee. I am sure that is because she's a teacher, not a business woman. So, she was attacked by emails and phone calls from a group a nannies for that reason.

Anyway, it may not seem fair that this new program is being criticized by nannies but they were just being cautious.

For me the correction does help me. They clearly will refund money if someone quits. Now they just have to break that down more specifically. For example, I should not be refunded all my money if I quit on day 6, but certainly if I quit day one or two I can get a percentage of fee back. They will have to figure out that policy to share with students before the pay $1,000 dollars.

I already have a Bachelor's degree but still attend conferences and workshops to learn more about being a nanny. If I am to take these courses obviously I should expect a refund if I am not satisfied and this program does have a refund policy.

For me, now I won't complain. But others might and that's what good consumers do when a new business pops up.

But many nannies HATE HATE HATE being housekeepers or doing any chores unrelated to childcare. Those nannies will oppose this concept forever. The starkey concept is more like being a maid and nannies will complain about that forever.

Nanny in Manhattan
18 Yrs Experience

Anonymous said...

Where does ABC Nanny Training stand with the topic of nanny credential exams? Would they proctor the INA credential exam? Are the credential exams a part of their nanny training? Don't you think they should have the INA credential exams ready to take at the end of the seven day course?

Anonymous said...

IT ISN'T THE FIRST OF ITS KIND AS ADVERTISED TODAY OCT 2OTH IN A PRESS RELEASE!!!

SOMEBODY STOP THE MISLEADING ADVERTISING. THERE ARE OTHER NANNY TRAINING PROGRAMS!!

Anonymous said...

Interesting read...I didn't know nannies were supposed to iron and change sheets...or am I just old school? (I attended a well known experienced nannny training school) L.S.

Anonymous said...

I was a little insulted by the implication that prior to their existence, nannies only learned on the job. Really? There are really no other learning options for professional caregivers? *eyeroll* T.L.

Anonymous said...

They cannot guarantee job placement, because their requirements to be placed as a nanny through their agency are MORE stringent than their
requirements to enroll in this week long class. IOW, to be a nanny placed with ABC, you must have 3 years nanny experience (http://www.facebook.com/l/;www.absolutebestcare.com/abs_caregivers.html), while to enroll in this class you are nor required to have any childcare experience. (http://www.facebook.com/l/;absolutebestcarenannylearningcenter.com/about_pay_tuition.html)

So, an 18 year old with a GED and no experience gets stars in her eyes, somehow comes up with the money to attend this course, and then she finds out that few
agencies will place an "educated" nanny who has no real world experience. IOW, she HAS to "learn on the job" for a number of years to have a chance at that eventual high end salary.

I think something here smells bad.

Anonymous said...

Certainly Ms. S. Roth and Mrs. Starkey have schools that have been around for 20 to 30 yrs. Maybe their "first" claim is just that it has some kind of NY certification.

Anonymous said...

I don't believe nannies should be paying $3,500 for a 7-day "school." Are there going to be minimum requirements to attend the program or are prospective attendees (even those with no or minimal professional nanny experience) going to be lured in to investing this money in the hopes that they will be placed in a job for $60,000+? The curriculum outline doesn't show anything new or unique in my opinion. These are all topics that are discussed at various times at conferences, nanny newsletters and even in the course of a general business day when communicating with and providing guidance and advice to a new nanny starting a position. Generally speaking, the nannies that we work with already are in tune with learning household preferences, philosophies and dynamics, how to be organized and how to achieve optimal nanny/family communication.

I think that nannies are better served investing those substantial funds in continuing their education whether it be a college degree in Early Childhood and attending industry conferences or events. There are a lot of these types of "certification programs" based in NY and I can say in 10 years, I have never had one client hire someone because they interviewed a nanny who completed a weekend or week-long program such as this. If the program offered something different that I felt would be truly beneficial and helpful to a nanny in order to advance in the industry and that by completing it this would enable her to secure a great new position, I would think that it would be something for nannies to possibly consider but I don't see anything in this article that stands out as being innovative. I would suggest to any nanny who was interested to ask if it will be provided in writing that this "school" will guarantee that they will find them a nanny position for $60,000 if they agree to pay the $3,500 tuition and attend their program.

Lastly, "top nannies" actually make $80,000+ at this point not $60,000. There are even some making over $100,000 even in a bad economy. I find that $55,000-60,000 is the standard salary range for all of our full-time nanny positions right now.

Anonymous said...

Check Northwest Nanny Institute in Portland (Lake Oswego), OR...they offer government grants or education loans. Maybe ABC will do the same. NNI does the "technical" school route serving underpriveleged individuals or welfare recepients. That is basically how they get their tuition's paid for and I think Red Wing college has a similar program (Minneapolis area.)