Thursday, October 10, 2013

How Nannies and Parents Must Sell Themselves During Job Interviews

Nannies and Parents are Sales People
By Jessica Eulo, Professional Nanny

No matter what it is you are looking to purchase or obtain, whether it is health insurance, a latte from Starbucks, a pasta dish from your local restaurant, or choosing a childcare provider you come in contact with sales people on a daily basis. Your server at your local restaurant is trying to sell you the specials of the night, your barista at Starbucks is trying to sell you the flavored drink of the month, nannies are trying to convince parents they are the best caregiver for their kids, and parents use salary and kindness to impress childcare providers to care for their children.

In my field of work, I am a nanny. I take care of two handsome boys. When these children “outgrow” me I will have to begin my search for a new family looking for someone to care for their children. I consider myself a sales person because I have to sell my personality, values, experience, and ability to care for children to the parents. If I do a good job at selling who I am, then the family will hire me to take care of their family. If not, they will pass up my resume for someone else.

In a similar fashion, parents have to sell themselves to job seekers by creating an appealing job description, offering an attractive salary and benefits package, and by highlighting their cute kids and that they are a nice family so that nanny candidates will want to work for them.

It's also important to remember that just as you wouldn’t go back to a restaurant that provided you with terrible food or bad service, parents and nannies won’t consider hiring or working for the other if they make a bad impression during a job interview.

Nannies are trying sell their experience, character, and values to parents to land great jobs. Parents who hire nannies are trying to sell themselves as fair employers and a great family to work with.

When you think of a sale's person, try thinking outside the box. I bet nobody would have ever considered a nanny or a parent to be a sales person.

Jessica Eulo works as a full-time, live-out nanny in NJ. She is currently studying Healthcare Administration at DeVry University. She feels honored to take care of children and have a positive impact on their lives.

1 comment:

Chris Benedict said...

Quite interesting.

''When you think of a sale's person, try thinking outside the box. I bet nobody would have ever considered a nanny or a parent to be a sales person.''
I agree on this point.